Training

Air travel is considered one of the safest means of transportation in the world today, yet every now and again an accident that shakes our complacency occurs. All too often, as we look at the accident cause, we say, “How could such simple errors have combined to cause such a catastrophe?”

An in-depth review of the events after the fact will reveal, time and again, that a series of human errors (known also as a chain of events) was allowed to form until the accident occurred. In about one in ten accidents, maintenance errors are part of that chain of events. If we can break the chain of events at the maintenance level, the accident will not occur.

This One or Two days workshop developed in 2000 by Transport Canada entitled “Human Performance in Aviation Maintenance Workshop” will introduce you to 12 Contributor Factors “Dirty Dozen” and Safety Nets” in the context of errors.

 


Various training programs to address human factors, human error, and error management in an aviation maintenance environment were developed and delivered across Canada. These educational training sessions have played a major role in raising the awareness of errors at the “sharp end” (direct human contact with the process), while perhaps not fully addressing the effect of the environment and organizations may have had on people at the sharp end.

At the beginning of the twentieth century, the science of Human Factors worldwide has started to recognize that the cause of errors is not just the cause of “bad people” but more so of people working within a specific context. This context may include: undiscovered errors and factors that are already embedded or part of an organization, and have potential to contribute towards actions and decisions people take. This shift in thinking being thought in the “Human Factors & System Safety Program” at Lund University in Sweden has been a monumental advancement in regards to the philosophy of error attribution and aviation safety.

This One-Day workshop developed by the Atlantic AME Association in 2010 entitled “Human & Organizational Factors in Aviation Maintenance” will broaden your knowledge and increase your awareness to the facts that organizational factors also plays a key role in aviation maintenance errors and mitigation.

Some Reviews…

“Very informative course that definetly brings common issues forefront and center, getting discussion on the matters”

“Good info, current case studies”

“This was very useful & nice to see new material. Nice to be able to have traininbg offered by the AME Association”

“ I look forward in future developments to this course. Well designed course”

 


As the academic views of Human Factors continues to learn and progress, this science worldwide has started to recognize that the cause of errors is not just the cause of “bad people” but more so of “normal people” who perform “normal work” within a specific context. This shift in thinking being thought in the “Human Factors & System Safety Program” at Lund University in Sweden has been a monumental advancement in regards to the philosophy of error attribution, aviation safety.

This One -Day workshop developed in 2017 entitled “ Human Factors in Aviation Maintenance – Normal + Normal People”  will broaden your knowledge and increase your awareness to the facts that errors are normal within working environments and mitigation can only beginning when sense making is understood from part of individuals who err and errors become acceptable within the industry.

Some Reviews…

“Good to finally get away from the traditional Human Factors”

“Good mix of interaction”

“Clear”